Beoplay H3

Beoplay’s H3 site site is truly beautiful. I’m often against the practice of hijacking the user’s ability to scroll, but the effect works really well on this site. Every ‘page’ is clean and minimal, but provides a very different user experience. The videos are lush and intimate, while the product photos are stark and ultra detailed. I must say that I’m most partial to the “cosmic parallax dust storm action photos” of the product.

Author

Giovanni DiFeterici

Giovanni has a BFA in Fine Art & a BS in Graphic Design. He is an accomplished illustrator & designer. He's the go to guy when it comes to developing creative solutions to complex visual problems.

  • Josh Riggs

    Hmmm. 20 seconds and counting for content to load on Broadband, and an immediate popup to take a survey. Maybe the design is great, but I bounced before I saw anything. There’s got to be a better way to balance good design with a quick-loading UI, and no popups.

    • http://unmatchedstyle.com Giovanni DiFeterici

      @Josh
      I agree that a balance is better in pretty much every circumstance, but I do think there is a place on the web for sites that push the envelope well beyond best practices. While the load time is pretty egregious (Ouch, 14.8MB), the dynamics of the page might be impossible otherwise.

      That being said, your point is very well taken. Even great design can fall on it’s face if it’s non-functional. Thanks!

    • http://ums.sc Giovanni DiFeterici

      @Josh

      I agree that a balance is better in pretty much every circumstance, but I do think there is a place on the web for sites that push the envelope well beyond best practices. While the load time is pretty egregious (Ouch, 14.8MB), the dynamics of the page might be impossible otherwise.

      That being said, your point is very well taken. Even great design can fall on it’s face if it’s non-functional. Thanks!

      • Josh Riggs

        For me, it was the combination of the 20+ second load time AND the survey pop-up on page load that killed the whole experience. I certainly agree with pushing the design envelope – too bad that envelope requires a survey pop-up! :)